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Faculty & Staff - Former Faculty and Staff


Martin Lawoko
Martin Lawoko
I work on ways to “see" bonds and linkages in wood, analyzing cell wall structures and linkages so wood fibers might be successfully separated and then later recombined as new products, new products that do not contain petroleum.
Dwane Hutto
Dwane Hutto
Serving as FBRI Project Manager, Dwane oversees the administrative functions for FBRI, coordinates project work for FBRI’s technical staff, and works with the Executive Director in planning for FBRI.
Byung-Hwan Um
Byung-Hwan Um
Forest biomass is a promising resource for future biofuels and bioproducts. Biorefining wood into paper and chemicals is not as easy as making a single traditional paper product.
Keith Hurley
My work with the FBRI is focused in the areas of catalyst screening and the catalyzed upgrading of pyrolysis oil.
Darrell Donahue
Darrell Donahue
With a background in process engineering and industrial statistics in industry and academics, his research interests are in the development of in-process-line sensors as well as quantitative risk assessment.
Yurui Zhen
Yurui Zhen
My professional responsibilities include calibrating and operating various lab and pilot plant equipments; redesigning methods and implementing and maintaining High-performance liquid chromatography.
Antti Grönroos and Hanna Kyllönen
Antti Grönroos and Hanna Kyllönen
Antti Grönroos and Hanna Kyllönen are married couple and visiting scientists from Finland. They were here in the University of Maine for one year doing research in the area of biorifinery with Professor Ardiaan van Heiningen.
Justin Crouse
Justin Crouse
I am part of FBRI’s technical staff. My job is to assist faculty and students in their research efforts by making sure our state-of-the-art equipment is working properly and used appropriately.
Anthony Halog
Anthony Halog
In view of establishing myself as an international leader in the exciting field of sustainability science, my primary research interest (that cuts across disciplines) is modeling and simulation of complex natural ecosystems in industrial symbiosis context.
Sefik Tunc
Sefik Tunc
Wood, the most abundant renewable raw materials on earth, primarily consists of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin with minor amounts of extractives and ash.
 


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